Community impact events

Lillis in fall
Fall brings many campus events that welcome community members. Scroll down to see events that may have impacts to university neighbors. Click each item for more information.

Dec 14
Resistance as Power: A Curatorial Response to Under the Feet of Jesus12:00 a.m.

The JSMA’s fourth “Common Seeing” exhibition supports the UO’s 2019-20 “Common Reading” of Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena Maria...
September 7 2019–February 23 2020
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

The JSMA’s fourth “Common Seeing” exhibition supports the UO’s 2019-20 “Common Reading” of Under the Feet of Jesus by Helena Maria Viramontes. In the book, the resilient protagonist,13-year-old Estrella, works in the hot California grape fields while navigating the realities of first love, financial struggle, family separation, and illness. For more information about the “Common Reading,” including upcoming university events, visit commonreading.uoregon.edu. Two special loans from the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) by artists Emanuel Martinez and Domingo Ulloa anchor the exhibition. Martinez created Farm Workers’ Altar (1967) for the Catholic Mass held in Delano, California, at which labor activist César Chávez broke his twenty five-day fast in 1968. Ulloa, “The Father of Chicano Art,” painted Braceros (1960) after visiting a labor camp in Holtville, California. From 1942 through 1964, the U.S. government invited agricultural workers from Mexico for limited-duration assignments to relieve the worker shortage caused by World War II. Ulloa presented a sobering view of the reality of life for these braceros (from the Spanish for “one who works using his arms,” implying manual labor), who experienced poor working conditions, crowded living quarters, and other challenges while employed in the United States. These special loans provide historical and cultural touchstones for Viramontes’s 1995 novel and contemporary works from the JSMA’s permanent collection, including recent acquisitions by Ester Hernández, Victor Maldonado, and Lilliam Nieves.

 

Resistance as Power: A Curatorial Response to Under the Feet of Jesus is one in a series of American art exhibitions created through a multi-year, multi-institutional partnership formed by the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of the Art Bridges + Terra Foundation Initiative.

Dec 14
Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo11:00 a.m.

On view September 7, 2019 through February 20, 2020

Experience the grit and daring of North America’s gay rodeo circuit. Blake Little’s arresting...

September 7 2019–February 20 2020
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

On view September 7, 2019 through February 20, 2020

Experience the grit and daring of North America’s gay rodeo circuit. Blake Little’s arresting black-and-white photographs explore the athleticism, artistry, and camaraderie of a time-honored LGBTQIA tradition while celebrating the complex nature of identity and community in the West.

A program of ExhibitsUSA, a national division of Mid-America Arts Alliance, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Dec 14
Journey to the Third Dimension: Tom Cramer Drawings and Paintings 1977-201911:00 a.m.

Tom Cramer (American, b. 1960) is widely known for his intricate relief paintings, which celebrate the lushness of nature and the mysteries of the cosmos. This exhibition explores...
August 17–December 29
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Tom Cramer (American, b. 1960) is widely known for his intricate relief paintings, which celebrate the lushness of nature and the mysteries of the cosmos. This exhibition explores his parallel practice in drawing.

Dec 14
Naeemeh Naeemaei: Dreams of Extinction and Under the Earth, Over the Moon 11:00 a.m.

Dissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the goal of this special exhibition, featuring work from two of the artist’s recent series,...
June 17–December 31
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Dissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the goal of this special exhibition, featuring work from two of the artist’s recent series, "Dreams Before Extinction" and "Under the Earth, Over the Moon."

Dec 14
Second Saturdays at the Museum11:00 a.m.

Join us on the second Saturday of the month and dig into activities that will spark your child's curiosity about our past, present, and future. December's Second Saturday...
December 14 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Join us on the second Saturday of the month and dig into activities that will spark your child's curiosity about our past, present, and future. December's Second Saturday is all about The Science of Solstice. Through hands-on experiments, you'll explore what causes the winter solstice, plus a whole galaxy of other exciting celestial events. 

A drop-in event, Second Saturday is perfect for children ages three and up with an accompanying adult. Included with regular admission; free for MNCH members and UO ID card holders. Show your Oregon Trail or other EBT card for an admission discount.  

Dec 14
2PM Walk & Talk2:00 p.m.

Tuesdays through Sundays at 2:00 p.m.

Enhance your visit to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History with a guided talk and exhibit tour. Perfect for solo visitors, couples,...

September 1–December 31
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Tuesdays through Sundays at 2:00 p.m.

Enhance your visit to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History with a guided talk and exhibit tour. Perfect for solo visitors, couples, or small groups, 2PM Walk & Talks are included with regular admission. Topics range from the geology of the Cascades to Oregon's dynamic cultural heritage. Call 541-346-3024 to find out what we're talking about today!

Dec 20
Little Wonders: Stories and More for Preschoolers10:30 a.m.

Now on the third Friday of the month! You and your child are invited to learn and play at the museum during our monthly Little Wonders event! This month's theme...
December 20 10:30 a.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Now on the third Friday of the month! You and your child are invited to learn and play at the museum during our monthly Little Wonders event! This month's theme is Ready for Winter, and we'll be exploring the many ways that animals prepare themselves for the cold weather ahead. We'll read a story, make crafts, and get up-close to animal furs that help critters stay warm during the winter. 

Included with regular admission; free for MNCH members and UO ID card holders. Show your Oregon Trail or other EBT card for an admission discount.  

Dec 24
Holidays - Museum Closed12:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be closed on December 24 and 25. We will reopen on Thursday, December 26.
December 24–25
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be closed on December 24 and 25. We will reopen on Thursday, December 26.

Jan 1
New Year's Day - Museum Closed12:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be closed on New Year's Day. We will reopen on Thursday, January 2. 
January 1 12:00 a.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be closed on New Year's Day. We will reopen on Thursday, January 2. 

Feb 4
"Beyond Buzzwords: Reimagining the Default Settings of Technology and Society"7:30 p.m.

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to...
February 4 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed, and even deepen discrimination, while appearing neutral and even benevolent when compared to racist practices of a previous era. In this talk, Professor Ruha Benjamin presents the concept of the “New Jim Code" to explore a range of discriminatory designs that encode inequity: by explicitly amplifying racial hierarchies, by ignoring but thereby replicating social divisions, or by aiming to fix racial bias but ultimately doing quite the opposite. We will also consider how race itself is a kind of tool designed to stratify and sanctify social injustice and discuss how technology is and can be used toward liberatory ends. This presentation takes us into the world of biased bots, altruistic algorithms, and their many entanglements, and provides conceptual tools to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. In doing so, it challenges us to question not only the technologies we are sold, but also the ones we manufacture ourselves.

Ruha Benjamin is an Associate Professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University where she studies the social dimensions of science, technology and medicine, race and citizenship, knowledge and power. She is also the founder of the JUST DATA Lab, and a Faculty Associate in the Center for Information Technology PolicyProgram on History of ScienceCenter for Health and WellbeingProgram on Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Department of Sociology. She serves on the Executive Committees for the Program in Global Health and Health Policy and Center for Digital Humanities.

Benjamin's first book, People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier (Stanford University Press 2013), investigates the social dimensions of stem cell science with a particular focus on the passage and implementation of a “right to research” codified in California. Her second book, Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code (Polity 2019) examines the relationship between machine bias and systemic racism, analyzing specific cases of “discriminatory design” and offering tools for a socially-conscious approach to tech development.

Mar 5
"On Rising Together: Creative and Collective Responses to the Climate Crisis"7:30 p.m.

What might we learn from the people living on climate change’s front lines about the future that we share? In this talk, Elizabeth Rush will speak about a...
March 5 7:30 p.m.
First United Methodist Church

What might we learn from the people living on climate change’s front lines about the future that we share? In this talk, Elizabeth Rush will speak about a small community on the eastern shore of Staten Island—a place that Hurricane Sandy both undid and remade from the ground up—investigating the storm's aftermath and the radical decisions residents made about how to overcome their shared vulnerability. She will give voice to those who have been traditionally left out of environmental discourse and how we might make the conversation more whole moving forward.

Elizabeth Rush is the author of Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore and Still Lifes from a Vanishing City: Essays and Photographs from Yangon, Myanmar. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Gaurdian, Harper’s, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, and the New Republic, among others. She is the recipient of fellowships and grants including the Howard Foundation Fellowship, awarded by Brown University; the Society for Environmental Journalism Grant; the Metcalf Institute Climate Change Adaptation Fellowship; and the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers. She received her MFA in nonfiction from Southern New Hampshire University, and teaches creative nonfiction at Brown University. 

All Community Impact Events